Do you have allergies to corn?Food allergies seem to be all the rage these days. Are they simply in vogue? Or are they real?

Unfortunately, food allergies and or sensitivities  are very real and not always easy to detect. You might have an allergy right now and not even be aware that you have certain discomforts and significant pain as a result of them.

Here are some facts to consider:

  • As many as 15 million people have food allergies. Many more have food sensitivities that are harder to detect with standard testing methods. 1 2 3 4 5
  • Boys appear to develop food allergies more than girls. 6
  • Childhood allergies to milk, egg, wheat, and soy used to resolve themselves in childhood, but that’s less the case these days.7 8 9 10 11

And allergies are growing fast:

  • There was an 18% increase in food allergies between 1997 and 2007. 12
  • Peanut allergy in children tripled between 1997 and 2008. 13

At IPRC, we can assess for allergies and or sensitivities especially the following:

  • Gluten
  • Peanuts and tree nuts
  • Dairy
  • Soy
  • Corn
  • Seafood (shellfish)
  • Eggs
  • Preservatives (e.g., MSG)
  • Genetically modified (GMO) foods
  • Pets, Plants, and cosmetics

We have manual therapy techniques that can help you to clear allergies and or sensitivities but you still may need to avoid that allergen in order to heal from what is has done to you and to become pain free.  We have often found that addressing allergies and or sensitivities is key to becoming pain free and feeling good.  Some allergies are temporary, which means at some point you can resume consumption, within reason. We’ll talk about what you need to know.

Gluten isn’t one of the allergens you can remove from your diet and then return to easily.  It’s a difficult substance to digest in the first place.  It occurs naturally in wheat, barley and rye and extracted gluten is added to many foods as well as skin and hair care products.

I have a handy card I hand out to people that makes knowing what a gluten free diet is simple.  Ask for one when you come in for your free initial assessment.

 

How we can help you

Show 13 footnotes

  1. Branum A, Lukacs S. Food allergy among U.S. children: Trends in prevalence and hospitalizations.National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief. 2008. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db10.htm
  2. National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of HealthReport of the NIH Expert Panel on Food Allergy Research. 2006. Retrieved from http://www3.niaid.nih.gov/topics/foodAllergy/research/ReportFoodAllergy.htm
  3. U.S. Census Bureau.State and County QuickFacts. 2010. Retrieved from http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/00000.html
  4. Gupta RS, Springston, MR, Warrier BS, Rajesh K, Pongracic J, Holl JL. The prevalence, severity, and distribution of childhood food allergy in the United StatesJ Pediatr.2011; 128.doi: 10.1542/peds.2011-0204
  5. Liu AH, Jaramillo R, Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Bock AB, Burks AW, Massing M, Cohn RD, Zeldin DC. National prevalence and risk factors for food allergy and relationships to asthma: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006. J Allergy ClinImmunol.2010; 126: 798-806.
  6. Liu AH, Jaramillo R, Sicherer SH, Wood RA, Bock AB, Burks AW, Massing M, Cohn RD, Zeldin DC. National prevalence and risk factors for food allergy and relationships to asthma: Results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2006. J Allergy ClinImmunol.2010; 126: 798-806.
  7. Skripak JM, Matsui EC, Mudd K, Wood RA. The natural history of IgE-mediated cow’s milk allergy.J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007; 120(5):1172-7.
  8. Savage JH, Matsui EC, Skripak JM, Wood RA. The natural history of egg allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2007; 120(6):1413-7.
  9. Keet CA, Matsui EC, Dhillon G, Lenehan P, Paterakis M, Wood RA. The natural history of wheat allergy. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol. 2009; 102(5):410-5.
  10. Savage JH, Kaeding AJ, Matsui EC, Wood RA. The natural history of soy allergy. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010; 125(3):683-6.
  11. Sicherer SH, Munoz-Furlong, A, Sampson HA. Prevalence of seafood allergy in the United States determined by a random telephone survey. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2004; 114: 159-165.
  12. Branum A, Lukacs S. Food allergy among U.S. children: Trends in prevalence and hospitalizations.National Center for Health Statistics Data Brief. 2008. Retrieved from http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/databriefs/db10.htm
  13. Sicherer SH, Muñoz-Furlong A, Godbold JH, Sampson HA. US prevalence of self-reported peanut, tree nut, and sesame allergy: 11-year follow-up. J Allergy Clin Immunol. 2010.